Four Years Running: St. Brother André Catholic High School students win Toronto skills competition

Toronto, Ontario ⁠— Yesterday, automotive technology students from across Ontario went head-to-head to compete in the 21st annual Toronto Automotive Technology competition at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre ahead of the Canadian International AutoShow.

A total of 18 schools competed throughout the day, with Anthony Vecchiarelli and Alexander Liao from St. Brother André Catholic High School in Markham, Ont. reigning victorious. The pair will now go on to represent their school at the National Automotive Technology Competition in New York City this April.

The competition⁠—presented by Centennial College and the Trillium Automobile Dealers Association (TADA) in partnership with Cars and Jobs⁠—tested analytical skills and knowledge regarding electrical suspension and brakes, engine mechanical, waveform analysis and a virtual engine management simulator. With 120 minutes to complete five working stations, the pressure was on.  

“Our judges were very impressed by the talent and the skill of not only the winners but all the students,” said Craig Stephenson, president and CEO of Centennial College. “They all have bright futures ahead of them and should be very proud of their performance.”

This marks the fourth-straight year St. Brother André has claimed the trophy. Last year, St. Brother André students Sam Luff and Vince Servinis⁠—cover stars for the last issue of Bodyworx Professional⁠—claimed the crown. In 2018, Christopher Giuga and David Vecchiarelli won the competition, while Ryan Gullage and Michael Lamanna of St. Brother André were victorious in 2017.

Collision Repair spoke to Jason Rehel, an auto shop teacher at St. Brother André in December to learn his secrets to the high school’s competition success.

“As educators, we know that our classes aren’t going to be for everyone,” he told the magazine. “If we can get a student interested in any course, though, we can help provide them with a path to follow. That’s why it’s so important to give young people a chance to try as much as possible in school.”

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